Posted tagged ‘Gospel’

A Tale of Two Robertsons

September 17, 2011

Sheep and Goats

This is a story of two men who preach a message.

One of them, in the trenchant words of  Russel Moore, really does  “repudiate the Gospel”.   According to Webster’s, to repudiate is to “reject as having no authority or binding force.”  Spurgeon said, “The very substance of the Gospel is Jesus Christ, Himself—His Person, His work, His glorious offices.”

One, a  prosperity preacher named Pat, declares to be dead a spouse who is  weakened by illness,  a wife who speaks hurtful things and is difficult to be around.  He says one can’t be faulted for wanting companionship–if you’re not blessed by the relationship,  end it.

Another Robertson, surnamed McQuilken, resigned the presidency of a prestigious Christian college to care for his wife who was diagnosed with Alzheimers.  It was  startlingly  counterculteral, because as one doctor who works with the dying  said, “Almost all women stand by their men; very few men stand by their women.” And he stood by her for 25 years, and he observed,

Love is said to evaporate if the relationship is not mutual, if it’s not physical, if the other person doesn’t communicate, or if one party doesn’t carry his or her share of the load. When I hear the litany of essentials for a happy marriage, I count off what my beloved can no longer contribute, and I contemplate how truly mysterious love is.

Which Robertson says the work of Christ has no binding authority on him?  Which one adorns the doctrines of Christ?  Which Robertson  really has really believed in the grace of God which has appeared, bringing salvation, that trains us to “renounce ungodliness and worldly passions ” (Titus 2:11) It is not legalism to be faithful to a vow, it is not the law that teaches us to renounce worldliness,  it is love and grace!

Which Robertson really exalts Christ here, who really reveals Christ to His people and makes Him great in their thoughts?  And who preaches a Prosperity gospel that has more in common with an Asherah pole than a cross?  That was Russel Moore’s  astute observation of  Pat  Robertson’s teaching.

Moore writes,

Somewhere out there right now, a man is wiping the drool from an 85 year-old woman who flinches because she think he’s a stranger. No television cameras are around. No politicians are seeking a meeting with them.

But the gospel is there. Jesus is there.

So which Robertson preaches Christ? Who repudiates Him? There are those who will ask, ‘And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’ (Matthew 25:40)

There will be an awful sorting of sheep from goats at the end of time.
It seems that Jesus considers that when we ignore the needs of the weakest, we have rejected His authority– and we have repudiated the Gospel.  Some will be on his right and some on the left.  Some will depart from him, forever.

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Lessons from Head Lice, Part 2:Community is Contagion and Cure

October 19, 2010
Korean War - HD-SN-99-03118

Image by US Army Korea – IMCOM via Flickr

In the last installment, a little bug had become bigger than God to me. Silly isn’t it? But, sadly we mortals are given to such short-sightedness about these things: too-few coins, or a centimeters growth of tumor, or a rift between you and the one you love–we magnify our weaknesses all the time. James McDonald has made an equation of it: Big God= small problems; small god= Big problems.   And the wrong focus will fill us with unrelenting self-pity and frustration and unanswerable bursts of  questions and angry upraised fists.

Yet the weeks  I endured of the patient combing-out of each of my eight children’s infested heads tutored me in perseverance, and strengthened the spiritual muscles of thanksgiving and faith and humility I would need for a very great struggle ahead.  The seeming triviality of this trial was really a microcosm of the Gospel–the shame that sucks up and sours all of life, the endless cycle of re-infestation with sin, the longing to just be clean as you load the washer again, the desperate reaching out for strength to endure, and at last, the blessed relief of repentance and rest found only in the One  who gently invites, ‘just come  as you are’.  And the repetition of this cycle of repentance and rest builds stamina.  Because, as  Alaistair Begg’s said,  ” Our patience in adversity produces wonderful security regarding the future.” Begg’s meant our eternal security, but I found  present security in Him, too.  And so the Father prepared me well for what lay ahead.

For as  I sat on the couch one night,  with a particularly vibrant-hued head in my lap, swiping at eggs, the phone rang.  I heard terrible news.  My brother, only fifty-three at the time, had just suffered a massive stroke, and was in the ICU.  There was  much intense prayer among us.  Yet he died.

I know that in the  few weeks duration of his suffering, my brother’s  own heart was being prepared for the future.  He had made a committment to Jesus as his savior as a young man, and I know that on his bed of affliction the Father was calling his prodigal home.  I will never understand why my brother was taken, leaving a wife and three heartbroken children. I said at his funeral that God is good and no-one will ever accuse Him of doing wrong. I spoke necessary words then, words that pointed to Jesus, who is our only hope.

I was not shaking my fist at God because I had been prepared in the discipline of giving thanks despite difficult circumstances, and so I  thanked God for the things I knew were true in this confusing crisis:  that my brother had re-united with his estranged wife, and they were joyfully planning a re-committment ceremony. That he had taken time, even time away from work, to purposefully  mentor his troubled son.  He had spent his last precious hours on earth restoring some kingdom order to his life.

I  was thankful as well that God sent my sister to that family ahead of time, before the crisis, and she was there with them in their time of need, to provide comfort and Godly wisdom and prayer.  Her ministry was that of presence.  She sat by my brother’s bed for hours, reading the scriptures out loud to him, and sometimes she was silently praying.  She listened to all the weeping and venting and the regrets.  She was Jesus with skin on to that benighted clan.

This  preaching of the ‘gospel without words’ —  usually a specious cover for those ashamed of the gospel  (and its accompanying aphorism is wrongly atttributed to Francis of Assisi, who neither did nor said it)  is often the only appropriate response to deep grief.

Remember Job’s comforters.

A soul  folded into the fetal position does not respond well to lots of talking. Two words like these will do: “Jesus wept.”   The Son of Man wept with the sisters who said to him, ‘where were you,  O God, when I needed you?’    Those of us who observe deep grief can feel great anxiety in the face of  these seeming unanswerable questions, and so we stupidly seek to fill silences, and have a fatal temptation to fix complex problems with platitudes.  We need to trust in the sovereignty of God ourselves, and  really believe that love never fails, and then speak only with fear and trembling. Grief is a holy ground we walk upon.

Some of God’s family walked  well, taking up our griefs as their own, and showed us sacrificial love.   When we needed housing for the funeral, our oldest and dearest friends took us in for the weekend, though they understood the risk of head lice–that though we thought we were free of nits, our infestation had been  recent.  I thank God that there are  such safe havens of hospitality and unconditional love.

Some reward for their sacrifice they got!  Nits in the hair of all the kids, and one child has hair past her waist, another a tendency towards dreadlocks.  Yet my friend was determined to endure even this humiliation and inconvenience to the glory of God–there would be no complaining!  That family will be recompensed for their  service, it will be returned to them, pressed down and overflowing, in heaven.

Such refreshing given to a weary pilgrim has a prophet’s reward. Still, some of us want a showier ministry– and so we drive with an empty tank, past the wounded Samaritan, multi-tasking and texting as we go, leaving little margin in our lives for the neighbor with no bread and great need.   But who is the faithful  servant, the one who comforts the fainting heart, or the one who just twitters his report of the calamity?  Facebook friends are often faithless ones.

I think it is those simplest things we do that have the amplest reward in  heaven, because they are often done with the least thought of self.  ‘What’, we say as we shake our heads in wonder at the return on our meager investment — ‘it was just a cup of cold water!  It was only a hug!’ Oh little faith! It was really a benediction! Those humble deeds are sometimes the most eloquent of sermons, for they are often the best means of changing a sufferer’s focus and helping him to know the Father’s goodness. That is the mystery of face-to-face community. It can be a carrier of the worst disease. Or it can be a container for God’s richest blessings. Oh, what He longs to pour out on his His people, but for our little faith.